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Rates

Apr 29, 2021 at 02:27 PM CST
+ 9

Looking for some feedback....We have carriers that will inquire about the rates on loads we have posted only to be told that our rates are too low. When we ask what they would need to make the run (once again trying to get feedback to take back to the shipper) the communication stops. No one seems to be able to provide a rate when asked what they would need. Why is that? If rates are such an issue right now why isn't there more open communication between the carriers and brokers?

Not looking for trouble just honest feed back.

Replied on Thu, Apr 29, 2021 at 02:47 PM CST

flatbed is 3,00 a mile anywhere not including east coast plus any turnpike. You should be at least in the ballpark at 2,80 plus tolls an washout plus bounce if you want reliable service

Replied on Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 01:06 PM CST
+ 1

The market is in the truck's favor at the moment and I'd guess they are going after the "low hanging fruit" and don't need to bother with it. And they probably don't realize a missed opportunity. There was a time when the "shoe was on the other foot" and you could hear the impatience in the brokers voice as you tried to make a decision because his other line was ringing and if you didn't want the load, the guy on the other line probably did.

I learned long ago from a customer to not tell him the rate was too cheap. Just say "I can't do it for that". This is where the broker can miss out too. The same way. They should then ask "what would it take"? Let the negotiating begin. The carrier should have some idea or the decency to say "I'll look at it and get back to you".

Probably doesn't help you. In some ways it's a shitty business.

Replied on Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 02:07 PM CST
Quote: "The market is in the truck's favor at the moment and I'd guess they are going after the "low hanging fruit" and don't need to bother with it. And they probably don't realize a missed opportunity. There was a time when the "shoe was on the other foot" and you could hear the impatience in the brokers voice as you tried to make a decision because his other line was ringing and if you didn't want the load, the guy on the other line probably did. I learned long ago from a customer to not tell him the rate was too cheap. Just say "I can't do it for that". This is where the broker can miss out too. The same way. They should then ask "what would it take"? Let the negotiating begin. The carrier should have some idea or the decency to say "I'll look at it and get back to you". Probably doesn't help you. In some ways it's a shitty business."

Dean, we have tried that very approach of asking "what would it take" or "what rate do you need" and get the standard "let me run the miles and get back to you". Then we hear nothing. No negotiating and zero communication.

Replied on Sun, May 02, 2021 at 08:24 PM CST

Are you just a one way broker. Do you have return loads. If not it will take time to find another load and charge accordingly

brokers seem to think trucks run for nothing tires fuel oil maintenance insurance. Even family living cost something.

the major players will keep you busy and will keep you broke.

Replied on Mon, May 03, 2021 at 05:47 AM CST

These are dry van, reefer and flat bed rates right now all over the country and have been for 7 or 8 months and the rates are still going up.

Replied on Mon, May 03, 2021 at 03:39 PM CST
It's pretty easy efforts 350 miles should be $70 Tom
Replied on Mon, May 03, 2021 at 03:39 PM CST

I know for me, that's all I can speak on, it's because we are trying to find a linking load to one we already have lined up. Usually when this happens, I might talk to 4-5 different brokers and the 5th has the best option getting me the closest to the next load and I've forgotten who all I have talked with.

However, the phone does go both ways. If I reach out about a load, I might get caught up in a truck breakdown or something and haven't had the time to call back. If a broker calls me back, I give them the real events whether it's that I've found a different load or haven't been able to run it to find the rate I would need.

Replied on Tue, May 04, 2021 at 09:55 AM CST

Depends on the lanes

I'm pushing $3-4 plus loaded

And taking a smaller portions for booking

Making it up in volume

Trucks are expensive to operate and these guys need to make a living

Replied on Thu, May 06, 2021 at 07:58 AM CST
I will admit that I've done that before. It's mostly because I feel disrespected by such a horribly low rate. When the expectations and reality are too far apart it just isn't worth the energy. There's only two options. Either someone agreed to a horrible rate and should find different employment or they are trying to screw me over. So you have to ask yourself how you would feel if someone was doing one of the two to you. Let's run through some numbers. I run a pneumatic. The trailer was 75k. The truck was 135k. The blower was 11k. Hoses, fittings and miscellaneous supplies another 3k. That's just equipment. Not counting taxes, insurance (another 17k) oil changes, tires and so on. The best advice I can give is that you figure out the distance between the pickup and the delivery. Loads over 100 miles should be pretty close to 4 dollars per mile one way or 2 dollars per mile round trip. Little short 30 mile loads should be around 8 dollars per mile or 4 round trip. If we're talking pneumatic. A good guesstimate for pneumatics is 23 to 25 tons per load for guys that run at 80,000lbs. I hope this helps. It's best to leave that cheap crap at the shipper. They will eventually get the hint.
Replied on Thu, May 06, 2021 at 08:52 AM CST
Quote: "I will admit that I've done that before. It's mostly because I feel disrespected by such a horribly low rate. When the expectations and reality are too far apart it just isn't worth the energy. There's only two options. Either someone agreed to a horrible rate and should find different employment or they are trying to screw me over. So you have to ask yourself how you would feel if someone was doing one of the two to you. Let's run through some numbers. I run a pneumatic. The trailer was 75k. The truck was 135k. The blower was 11k. Hoses, fittings and miscellaneous supplies another 3k. That's just equipment. Not counting taxes, insurance (another 17k) oil changes, tires and so on. The best advice I can give is that you figure out the distance between the pickup and the delivery. Loads over 100 miles should be pretty close to 4 dollars per mile one way or 2 dollars per mile round trip. Little short 30 mile loads should be around 8 dollars per mile or 4 round trip. If we're talking pneumatic. A good guesstimate for pneumatics is 23 to 25 tons per load for guys that run at 80,000lbs. I hope this helps. It's best to leave that cheap crap at the shipper. They will eventually get the hint."

I understand the aggrevation. But give them a hint anyway. If not you, then who? I know those numbers can be all over the board, but throw in your 2 cents worth. You're doing the math...