Home > Forum > Is $.20 The Magic # On Grain

Is $.20 the magic # on grain

Jul 02, 2020 at 01:59 PM CST
+ 6 - 1
I wouldn't even roll the tarp unless it is 20 miles or less. Wow people! Someone is moving this stuff
Replied on Fri, Jul 03, 2020 at 08:33 AM CST

In our area that is the going rate on grain from the field to the mill.

Replied on Fri, Jul 03, 2020 at 09:12 AM CST
Here it is on loads over 100 miles
Replied on Sun, Jul 05, 2020 at 08:17 AM CST

Combiners pay 25 per bushel and fill your wagon first. Don’t need extra labor and keeps the machine rolling. You run their trucks when full

Replied on Sun, Jul 12, 2020 at 09:50 PM CST
+ 1
Quote: "Here it is on loads over 100 miles"

I'm getting some silly rate offers lately too. twenty cents from various NE points to SGT. Bluff, or thirty cents to Manning.

twenty Cents for a 100 miles at 94,000 $213.20. it should be closer to $320.

thirtycents for 185 miles. (straight route is 40 ton bridge)

I kinda let it run, beause absoluty no work at home. And the out bound freight was paying pretty good. I was dragging beans from SC to Bunge for .27 and I thought that was fair. That was $2.58/ mile. But I'm not taking it any longer. Parked my rig, hauling gas part time until something breaks loose. I'm just scarred to death that the low rates will not rebound when freight starts to move again. I'm so close to retirement, but I really neeed to make some cash these next few years.

Replied on Mon, Jul 13, 2020 at 02:36 PM CST
I know what you are saying. Not looking good. I've been parked since mid April, its starting to hurt. But cant run it and not be able to maintain it either.
Replied on Mon, Jul 13, 2020 at 03:49 PM CST
- 1

We got guys around here that haul anhydrous so frickin cheap, I'm surprised they can pay the haz-mat insurance. I never thought I'd see anyhdrous hauled for a rate less than grain, but i'd be wrong. I wont do it. Most don't even know what they're getting paid for at least two weeks after they pull it. WTH?

Replied on Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 07:26 AM CST
I dont forsee anything changing for the good for sometime
Replied on Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 09:41 AM CST
- 1
Everyone is going to continue doing what they do, because it’s all they know how to do, and the government will continue to prop up trucking companies like they did with YRC, now that the process has been started, it won’t stop, eventually we will have government jobs.
Replied on Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 06:04 PM CST
+ 1
Quote: "Everyone is going to continue doing what they do, because it’s all they know how to do, and the government will continue to prop up trucking companies like they did with YRC, now that the process has been started, it won’t stop, eventually we will have government jobs."

Bingo

Replied on Mon, Jul 27, 2020 at 07:42 AM CST
+ 1

Yep...15 cents to local elevators..3ocents to KC..80 miles..

Replied on Mon, Jul 27, 2020 at 03:43 PM CST

you know I wonder about some of you guys. I know what I get per ton and per bushel and if what ya'al say is true about what you get compared to what I get than I have some damn good brokers

Replied on Tue, Jul 28, 2020 at 01:02 PM CST
+ 1
George thats wonderful you have good brokers. But your not saying what you get or your miles or your broker. So for me the local coop (Ag Partners) paid me .21 per bushel to go from Sabetha KS to Saint Joseph, Mo. 60 miles ag partners has run out of these loads for now, but Ag Processing apparantly has some beans bought from this facility and they pay .19, and I see Bonniie from AH Trucking is trying to get it done for .15
Replied on Tue, Jul 28, 2020 at 02:21 PM CST
Wasn't quite done with that post, I'd be open to any advice, I did try to get Bonnie to up her price per bushel once, it was one of her .70 loads that that usually figure out to around $1.50 per mile, and she graciously raised it 2 penny's per bushel, not what I had in mind, especially since average lane rate on bulk loads was listed at $2.50 plus per mile. which is still too low, but a lot better than the $1.50. Again I'd be open to advice or any brokers out there that need a good driver to haul loads, contact me, I'm ready, willing and able. I'll buy a different trailer if that's what it takes, I just started with a hopper because it can be used on my farm during harvest, but I can pull any trailer.
Replied on Tue, Jul 28, 2020 at 03:19 PM CST

I generaly load chicken meal and it pays $3.58 a mile to the truck legal load, not really crazy about loading grains because they only average $2 - 2.50 a mile. the current price on the wheat I load about 50 miles from the house goes 139 miles at .70 a bushel than I go 75 miles over the mountain and load the meal for 3.58 a mile. Your in Kansas don't think my broker can help you he's in Maryland

Replied on Tue, Jul 28, 2020 at 04:39 PM CST
+ 1 - 1
Thanks, George you got somthing good going there. Keep on a Truckn. Anybody in the midwest got somthing that good or better?
Replied on Tue, Jul 28, 2020 at 04:52 PM CST
+ 1
I'd recommend that anytime anybody hauls grain out of an elevator, to go on their website, and look at the cash bid for that grain. If the elevator took a .70 cent basis, or more, ive seen 1.50....if the elevator took 70 cents per bushel out of the farmers check for transportation, why would anybody haul it for .15 or .20?? Obviously the elevator has to make money, but if basis in that area was .70, I wouldn't haul it for less .40. If basis is a dollar or higher, I'd want .50 or better.

If the environmentalists get the pipeline shut down up here, I'd imagine basis will skyrocket because the railroad will be chomping at the bit to get oil on the rails. Technically that means the transportation cost should go up for grain, if you're willing to put your foot down.

I'm not saying the elevators don't need to make money, they do. But unless someone shows me what I'm missing, its seems to be theft to take a dollar per bushel from the farmer for transportation cost, then pay the trucker 15 cents? Any elevators willing to explain to me what I'm missing to have that opinion?

Good luck riding out this storm everyone.
Replied on Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 12:49 PM CST
+ 1
Quote: "I generaly load chicken meal and it pays $3.58 a mile to the truck legal load, not really crazy about loading grains because they only average $2 - 2.50 a mile. the current price on the wheat I load about 50 miles from the house goes 139 miles at .70 a bushel than I go 75 miles over the mountain and load the meal for 3.58 a mile. Your in Kansas don't think my broker can help you he's in Maryland "

What broker do you use in Maryland just out of curiosity? The grain loads around here are going for .70 a bushell except I've heard some have been offered .20 a bushell to haul as well but typical is .70 to go anywhere, ok if load is 200 miles or less not so much for over that unless you have a backhaul which is harder to get now. We pay .50 a bushell off farm to grainery when we need more trucks than we have available, others pay around .30 but never heard anyone here pay less, they pay more if you are using your own truck vs the farmers truck. Beans here are paying a bit or or less depending on if you use a broker or haul direct. Meal on East Coast pays the most or Limestone, everything else is around 2.25 mile or less right now. Although Live Haul pays pretty good if you don't mind getting dirty, so does Eggs, or Live Chicks, or sometimes Potatos pays well. Black Gold is paying about 3.00 a mile for potatos lately.

But before you think these are great rates out here remember we have four times the traffic, tolls galore as in every run we make costs us 50 a day in tolls alone per truck on average, Diesel is more expensive here unless your in CA, did I mention the traffic. Also mills are so full from farmers deliveries lately everyone has to arrive at the mill the night before by 5-6 pm to get off loaded by 7 am the next day typically and no our mills are not open 24/7 either most are not even open all week, and close by usually 2 or 4 if your lucky.

So perhaps your .20 a bushell isn't so bad when you add in everything else, while it doesn't really pay, if your truck is paid off it pays enough to cover typical expenses. Economics is in play when you have a plethera of materials or drivers the cost is always driven down in the marketplace, the price only goes up during "Scarcity" or when something is hard to get or hard to find someone to haul it somewhere. Until one or the other changes prices will stay depressed. Remember lots of big box drivers are currently trying to haul ag, and driving the prices down on the transport side along with now is harvest season and a ton of wheat just hit the marketplace. Until big box stores start shipping goods again expect prices to continue the downward decline, or americans realize that the cheap stuff they buy really does have a hidden cost. Themselves.

Replied on Tue, Aug 04, 2020 at 08:43 AM CST
+ 1
Quote: "What broker do you use in Maryland just out of curiosity? The grain loads around here are going for .70 a bushell except I've heard some have been offered .20 a bushell to haul as well but typical is .70 to go anywhere, ok if load is 200 miles or less not so much for over that unless you have a backhaul which is harder to get now. We pay .50 a bushell off farm to grainery when we need more trucks than we have available, others pay around .30 but never heard anyone here pay less, they pay more if you are using your own truck vs the farmers truck. Beans here are paying a bit or or less depending on if you use a broker or haul direct. Meal on East Coast pays the most or Limestone, everything else is around 2.25 mile or less right now. Although Live Haul pays pretty good if you don't mind getting dirty, so does Eggs, or Live Chicks, or sometimes Potatos pays well. Black Gold is paying about 3.00 a mile for potatos lately. But before you think these are great rates out here remember we have four times the traffic, tolls galore as in every run we make costs us 50 a day in tolls alone per truck on average, Diesel is more expensive here unless your in CA, did I mention the traffic. Also mills are so full from farmers deliveries lately everyone has to arrive at the mill the night before by 5-6 pm to get off loaded by 7 am the next day typically and no our mills are not open 24/7 either most are not even open all week, and close by usually 2 or 4 if your lucky. So perhaps your .20 a bushell isn't so bad when you add in everything else, while it doesn't really pay, if your truck is paid off it pays enough to cover typical expenses. Economics is in play when you have a plethera of materials or drivers the cost is always driven down in the marketplace, the price only goes up during "Scarcity" or when something is hard to get or hard to find someone to haul it somewhere. Until one or the other changes prices will stay depressed. Remember lots of big box drivers are currently trying to haul ag, and driving the prices down on the transport side along with now is harvest season and a ton of wheat just hit the marketplace. Until big box stores start shipping goods again expect prices to continue the downward decline, or americans realize that the cheap stuff they buy really does have a hidden cost. Themselves."

.20 per bushel really IS that bad, wether your truck is paid off or not. If the truck is debt free, its probably nearing an engine overhaul. Maintenance increases with age and miles right?

There's a ton of different scenarios but 20 cents isn't great. Look at it from an hourly stand point. I rarely do any local short haul stuff, but when I do, it usually takes me maybe 3 hours to do a round. 200 bucks for 3 hours is not enough. Would you do any custom harvesting for 65 dollars per separator hour on a 190k dollar machine?

Farmers are selling grain at record low prices that are no where near a break even, truckers are hauling for the big elevators at a price that is no where near a break even, and yet ADM and Cargil are seeing record profits? I'd bet CHS is seeing record profits as well. Nothing personal to the employees of those places. The farmers and truckers are collectively damaging ourselves.
Replied on Sat, Aug 08, 2020 at 11:16 AM CST
I am new to having my own truck and company, but any of those talking about 2.50 -3.00 a mile could sure count me in, and I would be greatly appreciative